Race, erasure, and current events: notes from a Richmond congregation

I’ve been working with my new church in Richmond on a project to critically examine its history with respect to race in this city. Everyone involved is keenly aware that research, acknowledgement, reflection, and memorialization are not enough. What we learn about the past needs to shape how we think about the world and how … More Race, erasure, and current events: notes from a Richmond congregation

SCWH is missing public history and public history is missing SCWH

The plenary session at the Society of Civil War Historians annual meeting kicked off with three scholars talking about their work in the public sphere. A great opening to discuss historians in public, but the audience bounced from classroom to Eric Foner to the classroom to Facebook engagement to the classroom to Reconstruction scholarship. I sense … More SCWH is missing public history and public history is missing SCWH

Personal connections, but not *those* personal connections

Here, John Hennessey speaks about the difficulty of changing how we talk about the Civil War. The problem, as I understand it, is that we (Americans) “like our history to be very simple.” Hennessey locates the origin of our present simplicities in the Reconciliationist narratives about brave soldiers and common ground. Simplicities calcify into “conventional wisdom” … More Personal connections, but not *those* personal connections

NC Historian on HB2

I would ordinarily just tweet a link to this Mountain Xpress article, but I think Milton Ready really hints at the historical, transformational, import of HB2, a bill “that was never about bathrooms or trans-anything”– Crafted by rural legislators like Phil Berger of Eden and Tim Moore of Kings Mountain, HB2 perfectly expresses a gerrymandered, … More NC Historian on HB2